Kuthira Malika

Little is known of the palace of the kings of the kingdom of Travancore , the Kuthira Malika. It remains shadowed by the fame and fortune of its own creation, the Padmanabhaswany Temple.

 

Kuthira Mailka gets it name from the 120 wooden horses carved buttress. For every room opened to the public another 10 remained locked, slowly succumbing to the abandonment.

 

The wooden horses that hold the roof

The wooden horses that hold the roof

The exterior architecture is the traditional Kerala style with intricate carvings. However the interiors have been influenced by different elements. There is a discussion room which took 80 artisans from Tanjore close to a year to finish. The end results is a ceiling adorned with woodwork beyond compare.

On display are gifts the Kings received from counterparts from different parts of the world. An ivory throne made from the tusks of 25 elephants, ivory cradles and shields from rhinocerous skin boasts of a time of plenty.

 

Traditional Kerala architecture

Traditional Kerala architecture

 

Carvings

Carvings

 

Parots

Parots

 

Sigh

Sigh

 

The symbol of the Travancore kings

The symbol of the Travancore kings

The Padmanabhaswamy temple was built next to the palace for the royal family to worship. The patron is Lord Vishnu. The sanctum sanctorum has an idol of Lord Vishnu reclining on a snake. The present city gets its name from this manifestation of Vishnu. Thiru – meaning Holy, Anantha – one who sleeps on the snake , Puram- Place. It translates to the place where he recline on the snake or Thiruvanthapuram. Along came the British and we have today’s shorter version of that – Trivandrum.

A couple of years back vast amounts of gold were discovered in  the temple vaults.  It is thought to be the offering the Travancore Kings made to the temple patron. The exact amount of gold has not been determined. Nevertheless if the rumors are to be believed there is emough gold in there to pay off the world’s debt.

Sri Padmanabhaswamy temple

Sri Padmanabhaswamy temple

 

Young devotees at the temple

Young devotees at the temple

 

Faces from paintings peeping out of the windows

Faces from paintings peeping out of the windows

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